Interview: Austra’s Katie Stelmanis shows off opera training with electro-goth sound

The following was originally published on Spinner.ca.

austra interview

From goth and witch house to New Wave and electronic pop, Austra‘s lead singer Katie Stelmanis isn’t sure what genre her Toronto-based band falls into.

“Honestly, I don’t even know what to call it,” Stelmanis tells Spinner. “It’s pop music. It’s electronic music. You can say whatever you want. It’s not like I hate it if people call it witch house, it’s just I feel witch house is a small genre that isn’t going to take over the world or anything — it’s not like grunge. I think it’s just a convenient place where my music fits in right now.

“It’s funny because I have been making music with the same aesthetic for a long time — the music that I was making three years ago, people still claimed it to be goth.”

Stelmanis was a trained choir and opera singer before she released her solo album ‘Join Us’ and subsequently formed Austra — who will release their debut album, ‘Feel It Break,’ this week via Paper Bag Records/Domino — so some of those vocal styles and moods have found their way into her work.

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Interview: Tokyo Police Club’s Graham Wright wrestles his past

The following was originally published on Spinner.ca.

graham wright tokyo police club shirts vs skins

For Tokyo Police Club keyboardist Graham Wright’s debut solo album, ‘Shirts vs. Skins,’ the match at hand seems to be between the musician’s past and present.

The forthcoming album is full of songs written two years ago, in a time when Wright went through an intense break-up and a lull at home after a long Tokyo Police Club tour. Getting this material out now means Wright has to revisit that unpleasant mindset.

“I was in a really specific place,” he tells Spinner. “Even the songs that don’t have anything to do with that, I can still find that in there. It’s kind of weird now because I don’t necessarily identify with the same things, it’s changed a bit. It’s going to be interesting performing the songs and trying to get back into that head space.

“It’s real and was something that happened, and that’s what I like about records, they document a real thing. That’s what’s important to me about these songs even though they aren’t necessarily current for me. It’s time travel, really.”

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Interview: Austra’s Katie Stelmanis on being a gay indie artist and Beth Ditto groupie

The following was originally published on Spinner.ca.

austra

We all have a musician we admire, usually because there’s a personal connection to them and their music. For Katie Stelmanis, a lesbian and the lead singer of Canadian electronic band Austra, it’s Gossip‘s Beth Ditto, also a gay artist, and her positive message concerning queer identity.

“I literally cried when I saw her,” Stelmanis tells Spinner. “She’s so strong.”

Though a 2009 gig in Toronto marked the first time she saw Ditto at the reins of Gossip, Stelmanis actually met the vivacious frontwoman five years earlier after a gig with her former band Galaxy.

“I was a total groupie,” says Stelmanis. “She was just so sweet. She was so nice and positive, thanked us and made us feel really good about it, which was so exciting to us 20 year olds — I love her!”

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Interview: The Wilderness of Manitoba Battle America’s “Musical ADD”

The following was originally published on Spinner.ca.

the wilderness of manitoba interview

Toronto’s Wilderness of Manitoba have already sunk their teeth into the Canadian and UK markets, but with the American release of their debut album, ‘When You Left the Fire,’ this week, they’re shifting their gaze towards the States and good old lady lucky.

“I’m not worried because I don’t really control these things,” vocalist-guitarist Will Whitwham tells Spinner. “The only thing I can control is playing well, and if we don’t play well then we’re screwing up for everybody. That’s the only thing we can really do.”

That said, Whitwham suspects breaking into the US market will be more grueling than building a presence at home or in the UK.

“Europeans are more patient and the US is musical ADD,” he says. “…It’s hard not to feel that way when you’re bombarded in the US.”

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Interview: Graham Wright of Tokyo Police Club on Getting the Vote Out

The following story was originally published on Spinner.ca. (And as a special election day post.)

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With the Canadian election for Prime Minister coming to its final vote today, musicians have been abuzz with getting the word out to their fans. Though they’ve been on tour during the election campaign, Toronto-based Tokyo Police Club have still found the time to urge Canada’s eligible voters to do their part.

“It’s been hard to keep up with the news and everything,” keyboardist Graham Wright tells Spinner from a Calgary, AB, tour stop. “Just go vote. I hope people do; nobody ever does, it’s so easy not to.”

Wright, who is about to release his first solo album, ‘Shirts vs. Skins,’ says he wishes the band could have planned something more proactive for the election on their tour with recent Juno-winners Said the Whale, such as setting up voter registration at their shows.

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